Upcoming Workshops


How to Write a Winning Proposal
 19 Sep 2019 10:00 - 13:30 - 58 Days to go

How To Negotiate Successfully
 14 Oct 2019 10:00 - 16:30 - 83 Days to go

How to Sell Lots More Weddings
 23 Oct 2019 10:00 - 16:30 - 92 Days to go

2 Day Supervisors Management Skills Training Programme
 12 Nov 2019 10:00 - 16:30 - 112 Days to go

Developing People, Performance & Business

Book Workshops

Press Articles

© All Rights Reserved. Conor Kenny & Associates 2018

No matter how often we make the wrong appointments, it never fails to astonish when the mistakes are repeated. Yet, how often has someone whispered to you "Do you know a really good 'x' person? I'm hiring"
The first mistake is "really good". If they are really good, it's unlikely they are available. If they are, isn't there likely to be a reason? Isn't that reason worth investigating?

Unfortunately, many businesses recruit with little or no regard for several key factors. In no particular order, but based on long experience, here's my view and naturally, my view is not prescriptive, it's just that - my view;
You are recruiting to fill a job, not to understand the real talent of the person in front of you.

As an employer, your track record in hiring and firing is not good. An on-line world allows everyone to report and have an opinion.
You expect incredible results from someone new but you don't trust them. 'No trust' is not compatible with 'incredible work'.
Your track record recruits 'ordinary' which isn't going to appeal to the extraordinary.
You tell them their future (and all about you) rather than ask what they want.
You focus on the 5% that niggles you but don't develop the 95% that's great.
You expect unbreakable loyalty after week 1. But warn others to "Keep an eye on ..."
You've often recruited 'good' but didn't invest in 'great'.
You created doubt at the interview. You told them what you wanted from the role but forgot to ask them what they wanted from you.
You focused on emotion without track record.
You focused on track record without emotion.
As a professional, you let your emotions out and we saw it even if we said nothing
You didn't ask the important questions or take time to get under their skin and sit with them. You just 'assumed'
You relied totally on 'instinct'.
You wrote things you shouldn't have but they were entombed in their mind ... and in print.
You talked lots but did you listen?
You didn't hear what they didn't say.
You didn't see what they did.
You thought you held all the Aces.
You assumed they needed you more than the other way around.
You didn't ask meaningful questions.
You didn't invest in training and development and weren't going to do it now.
You couldn't articulate a clear vision for the company let alone their job.
You kept talking money.
You told them "You'll decide shortly" but you forgot they would too.
You didn't understand the importance of collaboration.
You didn't understand Generation Y and Gen Z
You role played at the interview because you were out of your depth.
You saw the interview as a Gladiatorial Arena and told them competitors were a threat.
They were too smart for you.
They threatened your well feathered nest.
You simply didn't excite them enough to see where they'd add a spark.

You see, really good people want to be challenged, trusted, respected, developed, a part of something important. They want to achieve, succeed, push, climb and scale.
They have no interest in ego, anger, games and more. They simply want to do good work and make a difference.
Money is a measure but it's rarely the goal. For the really good people you're looking for, it's far more complex.
But, if you want to be average or simply good, then you don't have to change much. Thing is, really good people are never good or, worse still, average.
“If you think hiring professionals is expensive, try hiring amateurs”  - Anonymous

Grace Gallagher is Managing Director of Conor Kenny & Associates, a professional development, training and direct consultancy company focused on helping you get the best from your people, strategy and business which she joined in 2007.A former award winning hotel General Manger Grace is an honours graduate of Cathal Brugha Street with a degree in Business Studies as well as Hotel Management, she began her career with the Great Southern Hotel Group before moving to the Jury's Hotel Group and was appointed General Manager of Bewley's Hotel Glasgow in 2000. Since returning to Ireland, Grace General Manager of the Brandon House Hotel, Health Club & Spa and prior to her appointment at Conor Kenny & Associates, Grace was the opening General Manager of The Absolute Hotel in Limerick City.